An initiative of the American Library Association

Rogue Book Group Choices, Part 4

By Susan Maguire

And finally, here is part 4 of the list of rogue book group choices for when your book club feels like it's stuck in a rut. These selections are from Booklist's live event (sponsored by NoveList) with book group experts, and you can watch the full video of the event here.

The Opposite of Loneliness

by Marina Keegan

A combination of short stories and essays, this will serve older book groups interested in understanding the elusive millennial. Plus, the late author’s spoken-word performances can be found online, which will add to your meeting.

Scribner, 2015.

Click for a Reading Guide.

One of Us is Sleeping

by Josefine Klougart

A novel about grief, but it’s plotlessness lends itself to philosophical topics—definitely a book whose reading is enhanced by discussion.

Open Letter, 2016.

Quicksand

by Carolyn Baugh

A thriller! But the author brings in issues of first-generation Americans, the economics of crime, and human trafficking, all discussion-friendly topics. (This book is also quite violent, though not gratuitously so.)

Forge, 2017.

Click to Read an Excerpt.

Click to Read the Booklist Review.

Speak

by Louisa Hall

Your group may spend some time sorting out what has actually happened in this book, which has lots of different perspectives and an interesting timeline. (Plus, it will make folks with an Amazon Alexa think.) This will work especially for groups that liked David Mitchell’s The Cloud Atlas or Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven.

Ecco, 2015.

Click to Read an Excerpt.

Click to Read the Booklist Starred Review.

They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us

by Hanif Abdurraqib

A book of music criticism that delves into artists’ culture, intersectionality, and consumerism, and how race and class inform taste. (Warning: ugly cry potential.)

Two Dollar Radio, 2017.

Click to Read the Booklist Starred Review.

The Tale of Dueling Neurosurgeons

by Sam Kean

Nonfiction that reads like fiction for groups who like Oliver Sacks (although this is more joke-y).

Little, Brown, 2014.

Click to Read an Excerpt.

Click to Read the Booklist Review.

Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See

by Juliann Garey

This story of a man who walks away from his life will generate discussion about unreliable narrators and mental illness.

Soho, 2012.

Click to Read an Excerpt.

Click to Read the Booklist Review.

The Wangs vs. the World

by Jade Chang

A funny book—how rogue to discuss a book that is not a bummer! Plus, it’s a road trip novel and an immigrant story with lots of different pieces to discuss. If your group likes books with family issues—think The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney—this will be a fun one.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016.

Click to Read an Excerpt.

Click to Read the Booklist Review.

Susan Maguire is the Senior Editor for Collection Management and Library Outreach at Booklist.

1 Comment

  1. Deja Vu Florist Brooklyn on October 16, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    … [Trackback]

    […] Info to that Topic: bookclubcentral.org/2018/05/02/rogue-book-group-choices-part-4/ […]



JOIN THE CLUB!

Sign up to receive Book Club Central reviews, author interviews, and SJP Picks.

JOIN THE CLUB!

Sign up to receive Book Club Central reviews, author interviews, and SJP Picks.

SPONSORING PARTNERS

CORPORATE PLATINUM PARTNER